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heywood [2021/09/11 15:16] therbligheywood [2021/09/11 16:25] (current) therblig
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     * $300,000     * $300,000
   * Architects: Lee & Hewitt (NYC)   * Architects: Lee & Hewitt (NYC)
-  * Probably demolished, date unknown+  * Standing in alternate use
  
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 This was in many ways just another late factory project, very much FBG's bread-and-butter work, but is of special interest in that it was the first job in which Frank Gilbreth attempted to put Frederick Taylor's ideas to work. While the attempt to implement piecework rates for the bricklayers was firmly rejected, a failure, it is the first full step Gilbreth took from construction to efficiency and management consulting. This was in many ways just another late factory project, very much FBG's bread-and-butter work, but is of special interest in that it was the first job in which Frank Gilbreth attempted to put Frederick Taylor's ideas to work. While the attempt to implement piecework rates for the bricklayers was firmly rejected, a failure, it is the first full step Gilbreth took from construction to efficiency and management consulting.
  
-The project is described as two buildings, a 4-story plus basement factory of 60x425-440 feet, and a 4-story plus basement office building of 60x60 feet, all of brick and iron construction. From a photo of the office located by a local archive, it was located on Center Street. No factory structures remain on this street and none of the nearby standing buildings resemble this configuration, so it can be assumed they were demolished.+The project is described as two buildings, a 4-story plus basement factory of 60x425-440 feet, and a 4-story plus basement office building of 60x60 feet, all of brick and iron construction.
  
 Heywood & Wakefield was one of the largest makers of furniture in its day, originally making rattan and rush-seated furniture and expanding into nearly every other wooden good including toy baby carriages and tricycles. Their later wooden furniture is avidly appreciated and collected. Heywood & Wakefield was one of the largest makers of furniture in its day, originally making rattan and rush-seated furniture and expanding into nearly every other wooden good including toy baby carriages and tricycles. Their later wooden furniture is avidly appreciated and collected.
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 ==== Status ==== ==== Status ====
-  * Probably demolished. The Heywood & Wakefield plant in Gardner was described as “the largest furniture factory in the world” at its peakand a huge block of buildings still standsadapted into residential and other usesA photo and identification of location on Center Street cannot be matched to any existing buidings+  * Both buildings stand and are in use as apartment/condos. 
-  * [[ https://www.google.com/maps/place/50+Pine+St,+Gardner,+MA+01440/@42.5726548,-71.9954145,507a,35y,29.72h,41.59t/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x89e158d0d05a74d5:0x9139c259f701fd1!8m2!3d42.5762459!4d-71.9929706 | Google aerial view ]] — the Heywood-Wakefield complex today.+  * [[ https://www.google.com/maps/@42.5775601,-71.9933672,3a,90y,102.79h,104.85t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sgy02EgIMJF-MWNYLGPgEKQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656 | Google Street View ]] 
 +  * [[ https://www.google.com/maps/@42.5782536,-71.9946507,328a,35y,123.3h,25.29t/data=!3m1!1e3 | Google aerial view ]] 
 +  * [[ https://www.google.com/maps/@42.5726548,-71.9954145,507a,35y,29.72h,41.59t/data=!3m1!1e3 | Google aerial view ]] — the overall Heywood-Wakefield complex today, FBG buildings top center
  
 ==== Clips ==== ==== Clips ====
heywood.txt · Last modified: 2021/09/11 16:25 by therblig

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